Tag Archives: books

Enjoy the connections of bookstagram!

Since you are reading this, you are probably a library person, and you probably like books! But not everyone around us may understand our enjoyment of books and reading. Sometimes we just want to stay home and curl up with a stack of library books! Thankfully, there are some awesome online communities that you can connect with through social media that will appreciate and encourage your bookish ways.

This article from Book Riot details all the different ways you can connect to fellow bookish friends online, including book blogs, book Twitter, Goodreads, Bookstagram, and more!

You can check out these links to see which accounts you may be interested in following:

  • Best libraries to follow on Instagram
  • Cool librarians to follow on Twitter
  • Bookish accounts (including Cat Book Club) to follow on Instagram
  • Fun accounts for book lovers to follow on Twitter
  • And don’t forget to include hashtags in your posts, so you can interact with fellow book loving people! Good ones to use include: #books, #bookstagram, #bookblogger, #amreading, #yalit, #bookshelfie

Did you see your favorite book-related account mentioned? If not, leave us a comment so we can check it out!

 

 

Cheap Thrills, Private Dicks, and Desperate Dames From the Heyday of Pulp Fiction

The Gang Magazine May 1935

The enduring appeal of the lowest common denominator

Who was the target audience for pulp magazines and books?

Judging by the cover art and content, the vast majority of pulps were designed to appeal primarily to a young, lower-middle-class male audience. Many urban youths, immigrants, and other lower- and middle-class males were drawn to the pulps by the vivid cover art—which often featured voluptuous women in need of rescue—and became literate reading popular “adventure,” “spicy,” and “true crime” stories. There were also some “romance” and “confessional” pulp periodicals aiming for a female readership, such as Ideal Love, True Confessions, and All-Story Love Stories, and the Harlequin romance novels had their predecessors.

Who were the illustrators who created these images, and what became of the original works?

There were a number of talented artists who painted the artwork that was put on the covers of pulp magazines, including George Gross, Rafael de Soto, Hugh Joseph Ward, Paul Stahr, and David Berger, among others. There are a number of aficionados who have collected and preserved some of the original artwork, but much has also been lost.”

You definitely want to read through this whole article – or at least scroll through it all to check out the amazing art work!!

Why we should all be reading before bed!

Just in case you needed any encouragement for fitting in some extra bedtime reading, this article from Bustle makes a strong case for the reasons why it’s actually healthy to read before falling asleep. (Although it does note the difference between getting so hooked into your book that you end up reading instead of sleeping, which is not the goal!)

Here are a few reasons from the article regarding why reading before bed is a great idea:

  • Retain more: “When you sleep, your brain dumps all of your short term memory goo into the long term memory goo-reserves (in a manner of speaking). That means that the things you read right before bed stick with you better in the long run.”
  • Calming ritual: “Reading is the perfect kind of ritual: it forces you to lie down and cut out the distractions, it’s quiet, and it doesn’t get boring because you’re always reading something new.”
  • Better focus: “Not only does reading boost your concentration in general, reading before bed will help you concentrate more on whatever it is you’re reading in the moment. You won’t be battling ten thousand other distractions.”

Stories where women save the day – Wonder Woman included!

Feeling inspired after seeing the new Wonder Woman movie? Or do you just enjoy books featuring strong women? Then check out this article from the Book Bub Blog, which gives some reading suggestions for books where women come to the rescue!  (And don’t miss our previous CMLE blog post about women in comics, from guest blogger Carli Spina!)

West With The Night by Beryl Markham
“Beryl Markham’s life was a true epic, complete with shattered societal expectations, torrid love affairs, and desperate crash landings. A rebel from a young age, the British-born Markham was raised in Kenya’s unforgiving farmlands. Hailed by National Geographic as one of the greatest adventure books of all time, West with the Night is the sweeping account of a fearless and dedicated woman”

I Am Malala by  Malala Yousafzai
I Am Malala is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.”


The Secret History of Wonder Woman
by Jill Lepore
“A cultural history of Wonder Woman traces the character’s creation and enduring popularity, drawing on interviews and archival research to reveal the pivotal role of feminism in shaping her seven-decade story.”

 

Arizona Moon: A Novel of Vietnam wins 2017 W. Y. Boyd Literary Award for “Excellence in Military Fiction.”

 

Arizona Moon: A Novel of Vietnam, by J.M. Graham

Contact:

Cheryl Malden
Program Officer
Governance
American Library Association
312-280-3247

CHICAGO — “Arizona Moon: A Novel of Vietnam” by J. M. Graham and published by Naval Institute Press is the winner of the 2017 W. Y. Boyd Literary Award “for Excellence in Military Fiction.”

The W. Y. Boyd Literary Novel Award honors the best fiction set in a period when the United States was at war.  The $5,000 award and citation, donated by author W.Y. Boyd II, recognizes the service of American veterans and encourages the writing and publishing of outstanding war-related fiction.

J. M. Graham has written a firsthand account of the trials and tribulations of three individuals, two Marines, Cpl. Raymond Strader, Squad Leader who is on the verge of going home and LCpl. Noche Gonshayee an Apache Indian who is a warrior but caught between two cultures. The third individual is Troung Nghi a North Vietnamese Army (NVA) student volunteer. The novel set in the Arizona Territory in the An Hoa basin of Quang Providence, South Vietnam in October 1967.  The description of the living conditions and fighting is graphic and describes how the men managed to survive, fight and die in this god forsaken place.  Their only lifelines are their radios and the helicopters that often flew through miserable weather and enemy fire to bring food, supplies ammo, and mail from friends and loved ones.  This latter lifeline also brought reinforcements and evacuated the wounded and dead.

Continue reading Arizona Moon: A Novel of Vietnam wins 2017 W. Y. Boyd Literary Award for “Excellence in Military Fiction.”