Tag Archives: News

Update regarding “Former Librarian Faces Jail Time for Laugh at Sessions’s Confirmation”

This is an email from Julie Todaro, ALA President. (Jamie, mentioned below, is Jamie LaRue, director of the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom)

Colleagues – I wanted to provide an update to leadership on ALA’s work on this. Below is a brief overview and links as well as content on Jamie’s lead and great work from him on this situation.

  • Desiree Fairooz did not reach out to ALA for support. Jamie saw the first NYT story and began to research the issue.
  • ALA media found out about the same time when they received a few communications from members who had worked with her. Her colleagues identified her as a librarian, and asked ALA if/how they might help. Her story is here.
  • Jamie reached out to Ms. Fairooz and alerted American Libraries as to what he/ALA OIF and FTRF was doing.
  • AL told ALA media/us they would be gathering information for a story.
  • I had asked ALA/OIF and media to find out hearing rules and Jamie confirmed – as one might imagine – Congressional hearings can set rules of behavior and – apparently set additional rules at their discretion.
  • It’s not clear – based on the variety of reports – what all of the charges are/what they mean and which behaviors are the real issues (links are to stories with charges) and one opinion is while the laughter probably wasn’t a crime, her conduct as she was led from the room was determined to be.
  • Jamie is the ALA lead on this and will work with FTRF board.

Academic Business Reference and Services Section (BRASS) newsletter

The spring 2017 issue (Volume 12, No. 1) of the Academic Business Reference and Services Section (BRASS) newsletter is now available, courtesy of the Business Reference in Academic Libraries Committee.  

Inside this issue you will find ideas for designing websites and promotional material in “How to Stop Worrying and Start Designing: Four Books for the Novice Designer”; creating visual guides for business information literacy in “Searching as a Strategic Exploration: Using Visual Guides to Teach Business Research Strategy”; and preparing students for job interviews by researching the organization to present themselves as knowledgeable, in “Interview Intelligence: Teaching Students to Demonstrate Their Passion by Doing Their Homework.” 

BRASS represents the subject interests of reference librarians, business information specialists and others engaged in providing business reference/information services.  Learn more about BRASS. Special thanks to Annette Buckley and to the authors: Edward Kownslar, Grace Liu and Andy Spackman. We hope you enjoy this recent issue!

Janet Franks & Karen Chapman, Co-editors

Latest news from the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

http://www.ala.org/yalsa

Teen Book Finder Database

Have you heard about YALSA’s Teen Book Finder Database? It’s the newest and easiest way to check out YALSA’s book and media award winners from past years. This free resource is searchable by award, list name, year, author, genre, and more. Users can create customizable and printable lists and even locate books in nearby libraries. The database will eventually replace our book and media list pages on our website. Check it out here!

New 2017 Selected Booklists!

Have you checked out our newest booklists? They’re all available now!

Beginning this month, Amazing Audiobooks, Quick Picks and Popular Paperbacks are being transitioned over to The Hub. More details on this transition can be found here. These are the only selected lists that will be changing in 2017.

Continue reading Latest news from the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

Statement from MLA President Amy Boese

CMLE continues to serve as your sources for news around the profession. There are a lot of changes happening nationally that affect libraries, and library activities and missions. We are sharing information from our professional organizations with you to help you sort through ideas for yourself, and to have professional information to share with your stakeholders.

Sharing information freely, and understanding the value of valid and reliable resources as part of information literacy, are cornerstones of our professional work. These are issues we deal with every day in the library. Any changes to these core ideas are a problem for us, and we want to be able to address them.

People sometimes ask what kinds of things would be appropriate topics for library advocacy. Certainly anything you feel impacts your work in libraries, or libraries across the country, would be very appropriate to discuss!  You should feel empowered to talk with your legislators (local, state, and federal) to share your experiences and your views. (If you want to practice an elevator speech, or having another set of eyes look at an email draft – CMLE is here to help you!)

Read on for the MLA statement: Continue reading Statement from MLA President Amy Boese

AASL Recommended App (Humanities & Arts) Newsela

newselaIn June 2016, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) announced their 25 Best Apps for Teaching and Learning. The apps encourage qualities such as innovation and active participation, and are user-friendly.

Newsela is an app that provides news for students at their reading level. There are 5 different reading levels, from 2nd – 12th grade, and features a variety of content. The news sources are reputable and include the Guardian and The Associated Press, among others. Educators are able to track reading progress and each article comes with a quiz for comprehension.

Cost: Free
Level: Upper Elementary, Middle and High School
Platforms: iOS

This article from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute describes how Newsela can be very helpful in providing reading text that fulfills the Common Core State Standards.

Watch this video that details how to use Newsela in the classroom: