All posts by Mary Wilkins-Jordan

Portraits Of Librarians Celebrate America’s Bookish Unsung Heroes

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information, by Kyle Cassidy

 

(From Huffington Post, by Claire Fallon)

“Libraries are more important to our world than people realize.”

“Librarians hold a deceptively humble, yet powerful, role: Whether you’re a young child or an adult, a new student or an erudite academic, they offer guidance to rich worlds of literacy and scholarship. Librarians are on the front lines, putting a friendly face to the idea of book love and helping millions of Americans get the resources, encouragement and support they need to become avid readers.

Who our librarians are, then, actually matters a great deal. In Kyle Cassidy’s new book This Is What a Librarian Looks Like, the photographer reveals portraits of hundreds of librarians, sharing both their sunny faces and their thoughts on the value of libraries. The result: a colorful tapestry of men and women of all ages, races and ethnicity, some dressed conservatively and some with tattoos and brightly dyed hair, but all bursting with smiles and enthusiasm for their life missions.

In his introduction, Cassidy writes that he began the project after one of his future subjects, Naomi Gonzales, asked him to attend an American Library Association meeting. “She promised me,” he recalls, “that librarians were both friendly and photogenic” ― a bold claim that is backed up by his project. His book, which features guest essays by writers like Jeff Vandermeer, Neil Gaiman and Amy Dickinson, doesn’t shy away from discussing the challenges libraries face in an era of threats to public funding and a rising emphasis on digital resources over print collections. Nonetheless, the tone is heartwarming and optimistic, encapsulating the idealistic value for the written word and commitment to equal opportunity that many associate with libraries.

Above all, the volume is a touching reminder of the loving human work that keeps our libraries thriving, ready to help us when we need them.”

(Read the entire article here, along with some photos from the book!)

Cheap Thrills, Private Dicks, and Desperate Dames From the Heyday of Pulp Fiction

The Gang Magazine May 1935

The enduring appeal of the lowest common denominator

Who was the target audience for pulp magazines and books?

Judging by the cover art and content, the vast majority of pulps were designed to appeal primarily to a young, lower-middle-class male audience. Many urban youths, immigrants, and other lower- and middle-class males were drawn to the pulps by the vivid cover art—which often featured voluptuous women in need of rescue—and became literate reading popular “adventure,” “spicy,” and “true crime” stories. There were also some “romance” and “confessional” pulp periodicals aiming for a female readership, such as Ideal Love, True Confessions, and All-Story Love Stories, and the Harlequin romance novels had their predecessors.

Who were the illustrators who created these images, and what became of the original works?

There were a number of talented artists who painted the artwork that was put on the covers of pulp magazines, including George Gross, Rafael de Soto, Hugh Joseph Ward, Paul Stahr, and David Berger, among others. There are a number of aficionados who have collected and preserved some of the original artwork, but much has also been lost.”

You definitely want to read through this whole article – or at least scroll through it all to check out the amazing art work!!

Don’t Miss Out on “Reference Policy” from Amigos Library Services

Nevins Library First Librarians

Topic Area:
Course Type:
Status:

Reference policy is the foundation upon which reference services are built. This course will take you step by step in the policy development process. Come learn how to create policy whether for face-to-face, telephone, or virtual reference services. Also, learn to write guidelines that will provide you, your co-workers, and library users with the understanding of how reference services fit within the overall vision and mission of your institution.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify key steps in the policy development process
  • Evaluate how reference policy fits with the vision and mission of the institution
  • Create a reference policy for your organization
  • Demonstrate understanding of reference policy development with hands on examples
Target Audience:
Librarians and paraprofessionals who need to develop reference policy for their institution.
Prerequisites:
None
Homework Expectations and Completion Requirements:
  • There will be both in class and at home assignments to be completed.
  • It is designed for individual participation; each individual must register.
Session Duration:
This course consists of two 2-hour sessions.
Continuing Education Credit
Contact Hours:
4
Fees
Amigos Member Early Bird Fee:
$140.00
Amigos Member Fee:
$165.00
Non-member Early Bird Fee:
$175.00
Non-member Fee:
$200.00
Scheduled Dates

July 11 – 12, 2017, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm CDT (Register Now) — Early Bird Deadline: June 19

Day Twenty Two of the CMLE Summer Fun Library Tour!

The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures, by Library of Congress (Compiler), Carla Hayden (Foreword)

 

As library people, we no longer use the paper card catalog – and are thankful for the ease of online catalogs that provide much more information! But of course we  probably all miss the lovely old card catalog holders many libraries had, as well as the hand-written cards. (Good handwriting used to be a requirement to work in libraries! I’m grateful we can just type now.)

“The Library of Congress brings booklovers an enriching tribute to the power of the written word and to the history of our most beloved books. Featuring more than 200 full-color images of original catalog cards, first edition book covers, and photographs from the library’s magnificent archives, this collection is a visual celebration of the rarely seen treasures in one of the world’s most famous libraries and the brilliant catalog system that has kept it organized for hundreds of years. Packed with engaging facts on literary classics—from Ulysses to The Cat in the Hat to Shakespeare’s First Folio to The Catcher in the Rye—this package is an ode to the enduring magic and importance of books.”

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Acquisitions

Session 3: July 17 – August 25, 2017

This six-week online course is a basic primer for library acquisitions concepts common to all library materials formats. It covers:

  • Goals and methods of acquiring monographs and serials in all formats;

  • Theoretical foundations and workflows of basic acquisitions functions;

  • Financial management of library collections budgets;

  • Relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers, subscription agents, and publishers.

This course provides a broad overview of the operations involved in acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.

In FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders, receives, and pays for those materials. In many libraries, selecting and acquiring materials may be done in the same department—in the smallest libraries perhaps even by the same person. In larger libraries, selection may be done by a collection development department and/or designated subject specialists, while a separate department acquires the selected materials.  In essence, acquisitions is a business operation, bringing materials into the library and licensing access to library collections and resources.

Who Should Attend:  As a fundamentals course, FOA is tailored for librarians and paraprofessionals new to the acquisitions field; and librarians and support staff from other library units and library school or LSSC students who want to know more about acquisitions.  Although FOA focuses on the acquisition of monographs in various physical formats, it covers key components of acquisition and licensing processes for all library materials, in all formats, in all types of libraries.

This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Because success in acquisitions depends on ability to collaborate, negotiate, and be flexible to work out win-win solutions with others, this course includes collaborative and social elements.

Instructors

  • Eleanor Cook, Assistant Director for Discovery & Technical Services Academic Library Services, East Carolina University

  • Michelle Flinchbaugh, Acquisitions and Digital Scholarship Services Librarian, UMBC Library

  • Donna Smith, Assistant Head of Technical Services, Northern Kentucky University

  • Jennifer Arnold, Director, Library Services, Central Piedmont Community College

  • Kate B. Moore is Coordinator of Electronic Resources at Indiana University Southeast.

  • Christina Hennessey is Cataloging Librarian at Loyola Marymount University in California.

Registration Fees:  $139 ALCTS Member and  $169 Non-member

For additional details, registration links, and contact information see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/foa/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other questions or comments related to web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.