All posts by Mary Wilkins-Jordan

Decision Makers: Libraries are Ready to Code

Code-1076536

From the District Dispatch:

Computing jobs represent the largest source of new jobs and are among the highest paying, yet hundreds of thousands of openings go unfilled. And such employment needs are projected to continue growing in the coming years. Libraries are part of the solution in preparing more of America’s youth for these jobs

Libraries are ideal venues to provide career opportunities for youth in the digital age, explains a newly-released brief from the American Library Association (ALA). In “Careers for America’s Youth in the Digital Age: <libraries / ready to code>,” libraries are found to increasingly offer programs in coding and computational thinking—the broader intellectual skills behind coding—and are poised to do much more.

The brief is being released at the #HouseOfCode demo, panel and reception event on Capitol Hill on April 3-4. Nearly 100 students from over 50 Congressional districts will participate to demo their winning apps from the 2016 Congressional App Challenge. ALA is a sponsor of this event and we will have an exhibitor table and strong representation including our coding policy extraordinaire Marijke Visser as well as Shawnda Hines and Emily Wagner of the ALA Washington Office. Continue reading Decision Makers: Libraries are Ready to Code

Let’s Build Together: Minnesota Librarians Implementing the ACRL Information Literacy Framework

ARLD Day Pre-Conference Workshop

When: 4/27/2017, 1-5pm

Where: Maplewood Public Library, Community Program Room

Description: Unsure about how to move ahead with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy at your institution? Join the Minnesota Library Association Instruction Roundtable (IRT) for an interactive workshop designed to help you plan the next steps for your instruction program or individual teaching practice. This workshop is an opportunity to learn more about the rationale and philosophy behind the Framework, draw from the frames to develop student learning outcomes and assessment tools, discuss using the Framework for faculty outreach, and find out how other Minnesota librarians are putting the Framework into practice. After the workshop, attendees will be invited to participate in IRT’s ACRL Framework “23 Things” online program, an opportunity to utilize and implement the Framework through readings and activities while sharing your progress with colleagues across Minnesota.

Continue reading Let’s Build Together: Minnesota Librarians Implementing the ACRL Information Literacy Framework

Peeps in the Library Peep Research: A Study of Small, Fluffy Creatures and Library Usage

Peeps-Yellow-Pink
This is a website article from several years ago, but I laugh every time I read it! Thinking about your individual library users is always important; this site makes it funny!  Enjoy an excerpt of the site here, and then click on the link to see the whole thing.

Can you set up something adorable or funny or eye-catching, to show people how to use your library services? Talk to us at CMLE, and we can help!

Peep Research: A Study of Small, Fluffy Creatures and Library Usage

by Susan Avery and Jennifer Masciadrelli (Office of Fluffy Research, Staley Library, Millikin University)

Peeple’s Choice Winner! Faculty Peep Show, Kirkland Fine Arts Center, Millikin University

April 25, 2003

Although scientific and health research has been conducted on Peeps, most notably that appearing on the Peep Research website, we have noted an absence of research focusing on the ability of Peeps themselves to actually do research. To address this lack, we invited a small group of Peeps to visit Staley Library at Millikin University during the week of March 17-21, 2003 so that we could more closely observe their research practices. This was determined to be an ideal week for the Peeps to visit the library, as Millikin University students were on spring break. The research that follows documents their visit to the library and provides some evaluative commentary on our assessment of Peeps and library usage.

The Peeps Arrive at the Library

Photo of Peeps exiting a small VW BeetlePhoto of Peeps exiting a small VW Beetle

The Peeps arrived at the library in a customary manner, as evidenced by the photographs to the left, in a Volkswagen Beetle. It should also be noted that, not unlike college students, they attempted to fit as many passengers into their vehicle as possible.

Beginning Research

Photo of Peeps using the internet

We quickly observed that Peeps, like college students, immediately began their research by sitting down at the computer terminals and looking for information on the Internet. Our observations of their individual screens indicated that they were most likely looking for information about themselves. This research characteristic was noted in an article that appeared in the March 21, 2003 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education that discussed the tendencies of students to use search engines before library databases.

photo of Peeps looking at Peeps website

The first page we observed the Peeps looking at was the official website of marshmallow peeps. We speculate that this page was located via a search engine, as our attempts to replicate this search in several search engines resulted in this page appearing at the top of the hit list of websites.

photo of Peeps using the internet

Further exploration on the part of the peeps shows them at this website featuring Peep Shows. It is not known what the search terms were in this particular search, nor what they expected to find. (This page contains art work featuring canines.) Note, however, how they are all attempting to move closer to the computer screen.

photo of Peeps using the internet

This particular search resulted in a page that surprised both the Peeps and their observers. The focus of the content of the page, Visual Delights: Magic Lanterns, Peep Shows and Phantasmagoria, is unknown.

(Read the rest of this article!)

 

HathiTrust Research Center seeks proposals for awards!

HathiTrust“The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) is seeking proposals for Advanced Collaborative Support (ACS) project awards. These awards are modeled in the form of HTRC staff and compute time to collaborate on the proposed project during the award period. 4-6 awards are anticipated, and awardees can be individual scholars or a team of scholars, either from HathiTrust member institutions or non-members, though 3 award spots will be reserved for applicants from HT member institutions. The HTRC ACS-dedicated staff will provide a general overview of HTRC components, the HT corpus and HT computational tools, to the awardees over the course of the project’s time period.

For this RFP, we are especially encouraging proposals that will utilize our Data Capsule (https://wiki.htrc.illinois.edu/display/COM/HTRC+Data+Capsule) to do analysis on in-copyright volumes in HathiTrust.

Proposals should be concise, and include project narrative, detailed description of the data you’re interested in engaging with, a schedule of completion, and list of deliverables. Full details of required components can be found in the full ACS RFP, available here: https://www.hathitrust.org/htrc_sp17_acs-rfp

Deadline for submission is 5:00 pm Eastern, June 19, 2017, submitted electronically.

For any questions or to submit your proposal, email acs@hathitrust.org.

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For more information on HTRC: hathitrust.org/htrc

To see HTRCs tools/datasets: analytics.hathitrust.org

For general inquiries: htrc-help@hathitrust.org

Doing Usability Work? Submit it to Weave journal!

Weave Journal of Library User Experience Logo

Weave is a peer-reviewed, open access, web-based publication featuring articles on user experience design for librarians and professionals in related fields. Our editorial board consists of recognized experts in the field of library UX, and our editorial philosophy is to strive for a balance between theoretical and practical topics.

As the importance of digital services begins to rival that of collections, library user experience is taking a more central role than ever. While new jobs are being created for User Experience librarians and some departments are being renamed “User Experience” teams, there has been no comprehensive, rigorous publication for library UX professionals to share with and learn from their colleagues. Weave is intended to fill that gap. Weave helps practitioners and theorists work together to make libraries better.

Continue reading Doing Usability Work? Submit it to Weave journal!