Category Archives: CMLE

One of our travel bugs has made it to a library!

cheesehead-library-cacheOne of our travel bugs has been retrieved and moved on to its next location – and it looks like one that we can all enjoy!

The travel bug Libraries Rock made a quick stop off at the St Cloud Public Library, then moved on to its next cache – Enjoy the Journey. “The coordinates above will take you just outside of a place that holds a multitude of wonderful adventures. You can easily lose track of time when adventuring. Before you enter you will need to find a time capsule that will lead you to your adventure inside.” (Thanks, East Central Regional Library! Everyone from CMLE who stops in to see their cache, be sure to say hello to the library staff! This is yet another great way for system members to get acquainted and chat with each other!)

Have you been to this cache?

Have you searched out a geocache? Tell us about your adventures in the comments!

In December, as we are all working on stress management, heading out to look for geocaches and travel bugs – whether they started at CMLE or not – can be a great way to relax and enjoy some fun exploration!

From Good to Great as a library leader

Pencil tips
Working on our professional development!

If you’ve been keeping up with CMLE’s book groups on Goodreads, the phrase “Good to Great” may ring a bell! That’s because the book “Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Other’s Don’t” by Jim Collins was our November read in the Librarian Professionals group! We hope that if you read the book, you were able to take away a sense of what helps great leaders and companies function at such a high level.

Library Journal recently posted this article written by librarian and Vice President of the ACRL Steven Bell on why the book can be especially helpful to those in the library world. He discusses how the book is still relevant in today’s library leadership world, but also names additional articles and resources that have continued to build upon Collins’ book.

Bell names a main component that is necessary for achieving greatness – passion! Leaders need to be able to channel their passion for their work in a way that inspires others to follow them and leads their company in the right direction. Bell also gives some suggestions of how to lead successfully in the library world.

If you are interested in developing your leadership skills, CMLE’s Librarian Professionals book group is an easy place to start! Our book for December is The Happiness Project, and we welcome you to join us!

Updates on the CMLE travel bugs!

cheesehead-library-cache
the Cheesehead Public Library cache!

As library people, we are dedicated to providing information in all sorts of formats, and on all kinds of topics. One strategy for finding information is geocaching! To participate in this, we have set up five travel bugs we hope will be traveling around to libraries and library caches.

library-visitor-initial-drop-in-cheesehead-library-cache
Library Visitor drops into the cache, waiting to be taken to a library!

Our latest travel bug to head out into the world is Library Visitor. This travel bug was dropped in the Cheesehead Public Library geocache. This is a great cache, with a selection of books in plastic bags to keep them safe and dry.

One of our other adventurous travel bugs, Libraries Rock, has been retrieved! An experienced cacher located it, and left a note that she will be moving it on to a library cache.

Where might our travel bugs go?? What library-related adventures might they have? We have to stay tuned to find out! You can click at the top of the page to follow any of our travel bugs, to see where they travel.

Many adventures in information finding are ahead!

 

Learn about these 13 unusual holiday traditions from around the world!

christmas cookie
Learn cool holiday facts!

Do you find yourself lacking in conversational topics this holiday season? (If you are a librarian, you have all sorts of interesting knowledge, so probably not, but just in case!) Reader’s Digest Canada compiled this slideshow of intriguing holiday traditions that are celebrated in different places around the world. Don’t be put off by the goofiness of Number One – they are fun to learn about and the pictures are great too!

For a kids version of worldwide winter holiday celebrations, check out this article from National Geographic Kids, where they cover holidays from Hanukkah to the Chinese New Year.

Discover books about old Yule traditions

Snow Tracks
What sort of creatures are roaming through the snow in winter?

Interested in reading some winter books that aren’t holiday themed? This article from Book Riot should help you out! The article includes several books that delve into some of the older traditions of the winter season. Daylight is short, and the nights are extra dark and long, so it seems logical that some spooky and mystical traditions exist during the season!

the-old-magic-of-christmas-yuletide-book-cover-linda-raedischOne of the books, The Old Magic of Christmas: Yuletide Traditions for the Darkest Days of the Year even includes cookie recipes and craft ideas alongside it’s description of the enchanted creatures of the season.

 

 

four-seasons-of-mojoThe list also thoughtfully makes a suggestion for your probably stressed-out body with Four Seasons of Mojo: An Herbal Guide to Natural Living that includes techniques to help with winter-related ailments like colds, flu, and depression.

 

legend-of-old-befanaFinally, since it’s likely you will be around some kids at some point during the winter season, you can’t go wrong with Tomie dePaola’s The Legend of Old Befana which tells the traditional Italian story of an old woman and her flight to find the baby Jesus.

 

life-and-adventures-of-santa-clausExtra credit: Not included on the list in the article, but also incorporating enchanted creatures and magical forests (although technically, yes, it is about Santa) is L. Frank Baum’s The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus which I grew up enjoying!

 

 

 

Do you know of any Yule or traditional winter folk books that we should be reading? Tell us in the comments!