Tag Archives: book recommendations

Books in the Spotlight: Astronomy

Sometimes CMLE will highlight several books that have some factor in common. We hope they will give you ideas for your collection, or influence an activity, lesson plan, or display!

Since last weekend was Earth Day, and Astronomy Day is just around the corner on April 29th, we thought it would be fun to highlight a few books and activities that focus on planets, moons, stars, and space!

  • Read all about constellations:
    Once Upon a Starry Night by Jacqueline Mitton, illustrated by Christina Balit
    “Take an illuminating ride through the starry night sky, and learn how the heavens pay tribute to the gods of Greek and Roman mythology. Once Upon a Starry Night explains the ten ancient figures whose legends are written large across the universe. Every page shines with Christina Balit’s vibrant art, studded with shiny stars, and provides the perfect backdrop to Jacqueline Mitton’s poetic text.”

Be inspired by the book to make some marshmallow constellations!

  • Learn about the moon from The Moon Book by Gail Gibbons
    “Facts about the moon, including eclipses and its different phases”

 And definitely check out one of my favorite books about the moon, Moon Mouse by Adelaide Holl
“Determined to get to the moon, a baby field mouse climbs to the top of a large building and finds a big round yellow object sitting on a table and tasting very much like cheese.”

Learn how to make Moon Rocks from this short video (they look pretty at the end!)

For adults, check out this nonfiction reading list about space from Bustle. Two other reading options include:

  • Women in Science by Rachel Ignotofsky
    Women in Science celebrates the achievements of the intrepid women who have paved the way for the next generation of female engineers, biologists, mathematicians, doctors, astronauts, physicists, and more! “
  • Startalk with Neil deGrasse Tyson
    “This New York Times Bestselling illustrated companion to celebrated scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson’s popular podcast and National Geographic Channel TV show is an eye-opening journey for anyone curious about the complexities of our universe. “

 

Books about jealous new siblings!

Passing this on from a library listserv:

“An author has written to me through one of my children’s book blogs and I am hoping to help him find children’s books about children who are jealous of the new baby in the family. I found a book called Geraldine’s Baby Brother on WorldCat, but do you know of any others? Books with non-human characters would be a plus for this author, but I’ll still take human characters as well. ”

Here were the suggestions offered; do you have others? Share them in the comments section!

Looking for book suggestions: Donor-conceived characters in YA or MG literature

Books-aj.svg aj ashton 01

CMLE members: this is a library person looking for suggestions. She found a few already, posted below; but if you have others, post them to the comments!

“Once a year I ask the collective wisdom if they’ve come across any donor-conceived characters in YA or MG literature in their past year of reading since one person (me) can’t possibly read everything!

I’m wondering if any of you have come across any more. Donor-conceived people are those conceived with sperm, egg, or embryo donation, usually to single mothers by choice, gay parents, or those with fertility struggles in heterosexual families who can’t use their own gametes to conceive. I am interested in how identity as a donor-conceived teen or tween is represented in YA or MG literature.

I curate a list on my YA Books for Door Offspring blog and I am always on the look out for more fiction on this topic.”

You’re Welcome, Universe / Whitney Gardner

The Upside of Unrequited / Beckly Albertalli

The Secret of a Heart Note / Stacey Lee

Swing Sideways / Nanci Turner Steveson

The Other F-Word / Natasha Friend

Saving Montgomery Sole / Mariko Tamaki

Spirit Level / Sarah N. Harvey

Ashes to Asheville by Sarah Dooley

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue

Book suggestions for Habitat for Humanity Project?

Image result for Habitat for Humanity logo

A library person is looking for book suggestions. A few came in, andI’m adding them below; if you have others to suggest, add them in the comments!

“My library is planning to partner with Habitat for Humanity this summer.  I’d like my family book club to get really involved, so I’m looking for a chapter book for kids (any level above Picture book and under YA is fine).  I’ve racked my brain, Google, and Goodreads to find something pertaining in some way to the importance of a home, house, families who need a second chance, or even building a home – but I haven’t come up with much other than Crenshaw.  Any ideas?  Thanks!”

Continue reading Book suggestions for Habitat for Humanity Project?

Book Suggestions for Autism Acceptance Month

April is Autism Acceptance Month, and a great way to learn more about autism is through reading about the experiences of others.

This list from Read it Forward features six titles with a mixture of fiction and nonfiction. Some of the titles include:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
“This bestselling-novel has seen great success on Broadway after it was adapted for the stage in 2014. Haddon’s fifteen-year-old main character Christopher John Francis Boone knows all of the world’s capitals and prime numbers up to 7,057 but can’t stand to be touched and hates the color yellow. His well-ordered life goes off the rails when his neighbor’s dog is murdered, but Christopher sets off to solve the mystery, using—of course—logic.”

The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida
“His unique book truly shines a light on what goes on inside an autistic brain; author Naoki Higashida was thirteen when he painstakingly penned this book—a collection of answers to frequently asked questions about autism, like “Why do people with Autism talk so loudly and weirdly?” and “Why don’t you make eye contact when you speak?” Brought to English translation by David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas, The Bone Clocks) and his wife, this disarmingly honest read is illuminating and beautifully written.”

Make sure to check out this list of picture books compiled and reviewed by a school librarian! Some of her picks include:

Andy and his Yellow Frisbee by Mary Thompson
“I loved this subtle story of acceptance, probably because Sarah reminds me of my daughter. Between Sarah’s effort and Rose’s calm but protective wait-and-see, this story gently conveys to typical children that there is no magic formula for interacting with someone who is autistic.”

Ian’s Walk: A Story about Autism by Laurie Lears, illustrated by Karen Ritz
“Ian’s Walk is a beautiful story with a simple plot, but one that conveys the complex sibling relationships inherent in special needs families. It’s an obvious story to share with siblings of autistic and special needs children (or even in support groups for such)”

National Autism Resources has several lists of children’s books to choose from, or check out this one from the nonprofit literacy group Books for Bay.

Find more suggestions for books and other publications from the Autistic Self Advocacy Network here.