Tag Archives: Reader’s Advisory

Reader’s Advisory: Dial A Story!

Ericsson Dialog in green
Wouldn’t it be nice if someone could just read you a story?

For kids, it’s an ultimate treat to get storytime! And now it’s even available while patrons are away from the library: Dial a Story! Kids love to use the phone anyway – letting them hear a story can be an additional fun activity.  Dial a Story programs are going strong in many libraries around the country!

The Broward County library offers one of them: “Convenient, quick and always available – that’s Broward County Library’s Dial-A-Story, a free storytime-by-phone service that’s available 24/7 to anyone with access to a telephone. Dial-A-Story features four different stories at a time, and the stories are changed every other week. Geared toward younger children, the stories are a mix of contemporary tales, timeless classics and favorite fairy and folk tales. Professionally recorded, the stories are easy to access and loads of fun. To hear the latest stories, just call 954-357-7777.”

Professional storytellers are in on this action as well! “The Dial-A-Story program is an outreach service of the Jackson County Library System and the Storytelling Guild for pre-school age children. Guild members record stories on the phone for children to listen to from home. Stories change every two weeks, or more, depending on the storyteller. Children call the library at 541-774-6439 and hear the stories.”

A few other libraries offering Dial a Story programs:

Have you provided a service like this? Have you recorded stories?? This could be a great way to provide some Reader’s Advisory services to patrons – sharing suggestions for some fun books kids would love!

Reader’s Advisory: Storywalk titles!

A StoryWak in Saline, Michigan

Have you run a StoryWalk?

Have you been to a StoryWalk?

They sound amazingly fun! And they are a great way to involve kids in a book – and  hopefully interest kids in many more books!

“StoryWalk® is an innovative and delightful way for children — and adults! — to enjoy reading and the outdoors at the same time. Laminated pages from a children’s book are attached to wooden stakes, which are installed along an outdoor path. As you stroll down the trail, you’re directed to the next page in the story.” Continue reading Reader’s Advisory: Storywalk titles!

RART Retreat April 1: Embracing Romance


The RART Retreat is back! Register by March 28 and join us on April 1, 10:00-3:00, to discuss readers’ advisory for romance fiction and related genres and enjoy a talk by best-selling paranormal romance author MaryJanice Davidson. Cost is $25 for MLA members and $30 for non-members and includes breakfast and lunch.

Location:

Inver Glen Branch, Dakota County Library
8098 Blaine Ave.
Inver Grove Heights, MN 55076
(651) 554-6840

Schedule at a glance:

10:00 – 10:30  Registration
10:30 – 11:00  Ice Breaker and Introductions
11:00 – 12:00  MaryJanice Davidson
12:00 – 12:30  Lunch
12:30 – 1:30    Romance Panel Discussion
1:30 – 1:45     Break
1:45 – 2:45     Diversity and the Romance Genre
2:45 – 3:00     Wrap up

(Note from Mary: I really like MaryJanice Davidson’s books! If you like fun, fluffy, with a swig of vampires/mermaids/werewolves, that take place in Minnesota – these are the books for you!)

Thinking about manga titles?

Manga coloredMost libraries now have manga titles added to our collections, and they can be very popular with patrons!

If you do not regularly read these titles, it can be hard to know what the best ones might be for your patrons. Asking your patrons about the best, or the titles they most enjoy, is a great way to find good titles. You can also subscribe to listserves for manga fans, check out websites, or follow journal recommendations to get suggestions your patrons would enjoy.

The best way to get familiar with these titles is the same as all Reader’s Advisory suggestions: read them. Flip through the books and look at pictures. Pay attention to characters who appear throughout a series. Continue reading Thinking about manga titles?

Audiobooks and Reader’s Advisory: Listen to your books – and patrons!

someecards-ebooks
Pinterest: the source of all kinds of library fun!

Back in the olden days, books in the library were available only in paper format.

This is a wonderful format for transmitting ideas in many situations – doesn’t require battery recharging, easy to see in bright sunshine, less likely to be destroyed if accidentally dropped into the tub when reading. It’s stable, and with proper handling can last for many years.

But now we have all sorts of good opportunities to help people read books!

Content is the key; format is a choice. Books are more than their formats; format is just a way to transmit ideas.

I am an enormous audiobook reader. A format more ancient than paper for transmitting stories, sharing ideas verbally continues to be a good way to read books.

When you are doing Reader’s Advisory (RA) work in audio formats, it’s important to know about the reader. A good reader, or a group of readers, can make the book come to life; a bad one can kill any hope of enjoying a book. I don’t know that I would have stayed with Ender’s Game if I was reading in on paper; but the audio version definitely kept me going! I have listened to books I would not have considered, except they were read by Scott Brick, Lorelei King, or George Guidall – award winning readers, and voices I really enjoy across all kinds of books.

You can listen to books as you walk your dog, as you do dishes, as you drive to work, or as you set at your computer doing monotonous and repetitive work. The flexibility of audiobooks means you can get more reading done than if you had to just sit in one place and read. For an omnivorous book reader (raising my hand here!), audiobooks have a good place in my daily reading schedule.

A few audiobook RA tools and some advice:

Check out Overdrive’s services through your local library, or buy books from  audible.com (or other sources); and discover the joys of reading audiobooks today!

Any suggestions for good places to start in reading? Any RA tips for audiobooks? Share them below!