Day Twenty Three of the CMLE Summer Fun Library Tour!

Old books

Wouldn’t it be great to find something old, rare, and valuable in your library? It happens!

“A librarian in England has stumbled upon a rare page from the early days of book printing.

The 540-year-old leaf comes from a medieval priests’ handbook that had been printed by William Caxton, who introduced the printing press to England, according to a statement from the University of Reading.

“I suspected it was special as soon as I saw it,” said Erika Delbecque, a special collections librarian at the University of Reading, who found the paper hidden in an archive. “It is incredibly rare to find an unknown Caxton leaf, and astonishing that it has been under our noses for so long.”

The double-sided page has black-letter typeface and red paragraph marks that gave it away as an early western European printing, according to the university.

“The leaf had previously been pasted into another book for the undignified purpose of reinforcing its spine,” Delbecque said in the statement. Delbecque and her colleagues figured out that in 1820 a librarian at the University of Cambridge saved the page from the book spine but apparently didn’t realize its worth. The 15th-century leaf then ended up in a private collection that was purchased by the University of Reading 20 years ago. ”

Read the rest of this article here!

Portraits Of Librarians Celebrate America’s Bookish Unsung Heroes

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information, by Kyle Cassidy

 

(From Huffington Post, by Claire Fallon)

“Libraries are more important to our world than people realize.”

“Librarians hold a deceptively humble, yet powerful, role: Whether you’re a young child or an adult, a new student or an erudite academic, they offer guidance to rich worlds of literacy and scholarship. Librarians are on the front lines, putting a friendly face to the idea of book love and helping millions of Americans get the resources, encouragement and support they need to become avid readers.

Who our librarians are, then, actually matters a great deal. In Kyle Cassidy’s new book This Is What a Librarian Looks Like, the photographer reveals portraits of hundreds of librarians, sharing both their sunny faces and their thoughts on the value of libraries. The result: a colorful tapestry of men and women of all ages, races and ethnicity, some dressed conservatively and some with tattoos and brightly dyed hair, but all bursting with smiles and enthusiasm for their life missions.

In his introduction, Cassidy writes that he began the project after one of his future subjects, Naomi Gonzales, asked him to attend an American Library Association meeting. “She promised me,” he recalls, “that librarians were both friendly and photogenic” ― a bold claim that is backed up by his project. His book, which features guest essays by writers like Jeff Vandermeer, Neil Gaiman and Amy Dickinson, doesn’t shy away from discussing the challenges libraries face in an era of threats to public funding and a rising emphasis on digital resources over print collections. Nonetheless, the tone is heartwarming and optimistic, encapsulating the idealistic value for the written word and commitment to equal opportunity that many associate with libraries.

Above all, the volume is a touching reminder of the loving human work that keeps our libraries thriving, ready to help us when we need them.”

(Read the entire article here, along with some photos from the book!)

Cheap Thrills, Private Dicks, and Desperate Dames From the Heyday of Pulp Fiction

The Gang Magazine May 1935

The enduring appeal of the lowest common denominator

Who was the target audience for pulp magazines and books?

Judging by the cover art and content, the vast majority of pulps were designed to appeal primarily to a young, lower-middle-class male audience. Many urban youths, immigrants, and other lower- and middle-class males were drawn to the pulps by the vivid cover art—which often featured voluptuous women in need of rescue—and became literate reading popular “adventure,” “spicy,” and “true crime” stories. There were also some “romance” and “confessional” pulp periodicals aiming for a female readership, such as Ideal Love, True Confessions, and All-Story Love Stories, and the Harlequin romance novels had their predecessors.

Who were the illustrators who created these images, and what became of the original works?

There were a number of talented artists who painted the artwork that was put on the covers of pulp magazines, including George Gross, Rafael de Soto, Hugh Joseph Ward, Paul Stahr, and David Berger, among others. There are a number of aficionados who have collected and preserved some of the original artwork, but much has also been lost.”

You definitely want to read through this whole article – or at least scroll through it all to check out the amazing art work!!

How being mindful can help your work as a librarian

We’d all like to have more inner peace and behave with more kindness and patience as we go through our day, right? Life in the library field can be stressful and exhausting with constant demands from students, patrons, supervisors. or stakeholders. This article from American Libraries is all about mindful librarianship and how learning to practice mindfulness has helped some librarians with their work lives.

What is mindfulness, anyway? According to the American Psychological Association it is the “moment-to-moment awareness of one’s experience without judgment.” Through the use of breathing exercises and meditation, the goal is to be in the moment without worries or distractions.

Being able to be mindful while working in a library can have huge benefits, particularly in relation to stress. If you work in a library, you know that things aren’t always smooth and easy, especially when there is too much work to do and too little time in which to do it! The article acknowledges that “many librarians feel that they are spread increasingly thin on the job, yet their performance often depends on their ability to maintain focus amid a flurry of responsibilities. That’s something with which mindfulness can help.”

Read more about the benefits of practicing mindfulness as a library person here.

And if you want to know more, check out CMLE’s past series on mindfulness and see if the practice is beneficial to you!

Don’t Miss Out on “Reference Policy” from Amigos Library Services

Nevins Library First Librarians

Topic Area:
Course Type:
Status:

Reference policy is the foundation upon which reference services are built. This course will take you step by step in the policy development process. Come learn how to create policy whether for face-to-face, telephone, or virtual reference services. Also, learn to write guidelines that will provide you, your co-workers, and library users with the understanding of how reference services fit within the overall vision and mission of your institution.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify key steps in the policy development process
  • Evaluate how reference policy fits with the vision and mission of the institution
  • Create a reference policy for your organization
  • Demonstrate understanding of reference policy development with hands on examples
Target Audience:
Librarians and paraprofessionals who need to develop reference policy for their institution.
Prerequisites:
None
Homework Expectations and Completion Requirements:
  • There will be both in class and at home assignments to be completed.
  • It is designed for individual participation; each individual must register.
Session Duration:
This course consists of two 2-hour sessions.
Continuing Education Credit
Contact Hours:
4
Fees
Amigos Member Early Bird Fee:
$140.00
Amigos Member Fee:
$165.00
Non-member Early Bird Fee:
$175.00
Non-member Fee:
$200.00
Scheduled Dates

July 11 – 12, 2017, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm CDT (Register Now) — Early Bird Deadline: June 19

We support libraries!