Tag Archives: books

Twelve Things That Happen When You Read for 24 Hours Straight

Bibliotecaestantes

This article is from Book Riot, by Danika Ellis. We are not having an official CMLE 24 hour readathon this April – but we would love to hear from you about the books you are reading!

In Minnesota, this event starts Saturday at 7:00am; so as you read books this weekend, use to connect with the larger community around the world, and to connect with us! Sign up at the official website, and let’s read!

“(If you’d like to follow my journey through these 12 stages, I’ll be live tweeting @DanikaEllis!)”

Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is–well, self-explanatory for the most part. It takes place every April and October, and it is a huge internet book party! I love it! (Unsurprisingly, because I’ve written about it a bunch.) There is a misconception about the readathon I’d like to address, though. For some reason–who knows why!–people seem to think you have to read 24 hours during the 24 hour readathon. You can, of course! But you can also just read as much as you want to. I’ve stayed up the full 24 hours before, though I did take breaks during a few of the hours. I usually regret it, though. Here is my experience of reading for 24 hours: Continue reading Twelve Things That Happen When You Read for 24 Hours Straight

James Patterson is donating money to schools for books!

James Patterson

From the Miami Herald (Click to read the entire story!)

James Patterson is giving away more money to get kids reading. And your school library could get some.

In the third installment of his School Library Campaign in partnership with Scholastic Reading Club, Patterson — author of books for middle grades and adults — is donating $1.75 million to school libraries around the country.

This time around, the plan focuses on teachers. Patterson will award $500 grants to 3,500 teachers in grades pre-K through 12 in U.S. schools to improve their classroom libraries. The funds can be used to buy new books, expand programming or even build more bookshelves, if that’s what’s needed.

“Many kids rely solely on their classroom bookshelves for reading material, particularly in schools without a library,” Patterson said in a statement. “I’m excited to expand the reach of the program, and make a positive impact on teachers who are working with students all day, every day, in every school in the country.”

Here is the application. Pass this on to your teachers; and we can help with any part of it!

This weekend: Sunday, April 23 is World Book Day

This coming weekend is going to be a big one! After you celebrate Earth Day on Saturday, you can look forward to celebrating books on Sunday, which is World Book Day! As library people, not only do we love books ourselves, but we love to share our love of books with others, and this is a great day to do that!

World Book Day was created in 1995 at UNESCO’s General Conference, “to pay a world-wide tribute to books and authors on this date, encouraging everyone, and in particular young people, to discover the pleasure of reading and gain a renewed respect for the irreplaceable contributions of those, who have furthered the social and cultural progress of humanity.”

Here are some suggestions for celebrating World Book Day:

  • Amazon is participating with their page promoting the day and featuring links to charitable organizations that provide books.
    • You can also use the hashtag #LoveToRead to share your book happy moments on social media!
  • Check out these awesome and adorable World Book Day costumes (or make your own!)
  • Play this free printable World Book Day Game (aimed at kids but could still be fun!)
  • Or simply curl up with a good book and enjoy! 🙂

 

Stumper: book about an African Gray Parrot

Book sale loot (4552277923)
CMLE people – I found another library person asking for help identifying a book a patron is seeking. As you guys have collectively been good at finding these books in the past, I’m posting this here for you. If you know it, you can post it to the comments, or send me an email!

“I hope it’s OK to post stumpers to this listserv – if there’s a better place, please let me know!

Patron is trying to track down a children’s book they read to their kids in the ’80s.
The title is [Boy’s Name] Gray, where [Boy’s name] is a two-syllable name and Gray refers to his African Gray Parrot.
It’s ringing zero bells in my head, and searches in Books in Print & Amazon didn’t pull anything up. Thought I’d see if one of you clever people may recall the book or have A Level sleuthing skills and can track it down.
Thanks in advance!”

New releases to help with your 2017 Goodreads Challenge

Are you participating in a Reading Challenge on Goodreads this year? I decided to aim high this year, and set my goal to read 100 books. Since I’ve only finished 17 so far, I’ve got some work to do! Perhaps you’d like some extra motivation, or are just curious what other people are reading during their challenge.

This post from Goodreads shares some of the most popular new releases from this year that people are reading during their challenge. Here are a few from the list:

The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney
“In the tradition of The Girl on the Train, The Silent Wife, and Gone Girl comes an enthralling psychological thriller that spins one woman’s seemingly good fortune, and another woman’s mysterious fate, through a kaleidoscope of duplicity, death, and deception.”

 

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders
“On February 22, 1862, two days after his death, Willie Lincoln was laid to rest in a marble crypt in a Georgetown cemetery. That very night, shattered by grief, Abraham Lincoln arrives at the cemetery under cover of darkness and visits the crypt, alone, to spend time with his son’s body.”

 

My Not So Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella
“Katie Brenner has the perfect life: a flat in London, a glamorous job, and a super-cool Instagram feed.
Ok, so the real truth is that she rents a tiny room with no space for a wardrobe, has a hideous commute to a lowly admin job, and the life she shares on Instagram isn’t really hers.
But one day her dreams are bound to come true, aren’t they?”

The article also links to their short reading suggestions, which is helpful if you’re like me and need to increase your numbers of finished books 🙂