Tag Archives: books

Free art books available to your library!

Beadwork Wire Art and Crafts (27)

This might be a good opportunity for your collection! Art resources tend to be expensive and not well collected; adding some books to your collection can help you to meet the needs of your community members. If you want some help with this application, or creating a collection development policy, just let us know. We are here for you!

“The Distribution to Underserved Communities Library Program (D.U.C.) distributes books on contemporary art and culture to public schools, libraries, prisons, and alternative education centers nationwide, free of charge. D.U.C. books create access to the arts and literacy these institutions could not otherwise afford to acquire. To date, the D.U.C. has placed over 436,395 free books in 7,817 public institutions across the country. Visit our distribution map.

“If you are a public school or library and define your community as underserved, you are eligible to receive free D.U.C. books. We invite participating libraries to order books from our catalog once annually. Your library may order as many books as you like at one copy per title.

Please browse our catalog and select materials according to the interests and needs of your community. Our catalog is organized by artist, publisher, and theme: we hope these guides will facilitate your search. We also encourage you to use the educational guides available in our journal to assist in incorporating books into classroom curricula and library programming. To place your order, please follow the link at the bottom right of the catalog. You will be prompted to log in or create an account, and follow the links to submit your order. You may expect to receive books within 4-8 weeks of your order.”

Continue reading Free art books available to your library!

100 Books Across America

Maybe you took a road trip around the country this summer, or wish you had! Either way, this book list will help you get a feel for each state. The list contains one fiction and one non-fiction book set in (or about) each state in the U.S. and also includes the most famous book set in each state. This is from an article on LitHub and you can read the full list here! Here are a few samples:

Minnesota: 

North Dakota:

Wisconsin: 

 

We hope you are enjoying National Book Lover’s Day!

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/253538653992984835/August 9th is National Book Lover’s Day, and as library people, it is no secret at all that we love books!! (And encourage our families to love books too, as you can see from this picture below!)

Just in case you need a little extra encouragement to celebrate this excellent day, here’s a great article from the Literacy and NCTE blog with suggestions on how to share your love of books. Check out this list of Twenty Sayings to Share with Bibliophiles. Or, just grab a selection from your TBR pile and get reading! 🙂

 

Enjoy the connections of bookstagram!

Since you are reading this, you are probably a library person, and you probably like books! But not everyone around us may understand our enjoyment of books and reading. Sometimes we just want to stay home and curl up with a stack of library books! Thankfully, there are some awesome online communities that you can connect with through social media that will appreciate and encourage your bookish ways.

This article from Book Riot details all the different ways you can connect to fellow bookish friends online, including book blogs, book Twitter, Goodreads, Bookstagram, and more!

You can check out these links to see which accounts you may be interested in following:

  • Best libraries to follow on Instagram
  • Cool librarians to follow on Twitter
  • Bookish accounts (including Cat Book Club) to follow on Instagram
  • Fun accounts for book lovers to follow on Twitter
  • And don’t forget to include hashtags in your posts, so you can interact with fellow book loving people! Good ones to use include: #books, #bookstagram, #bookblogger, #amreading, #yalit, #bookshelfie

Did you see your favorite book-related account mentioned? If not, leave us a comment so we can check it out!

 

 

Cheap Thrills, Private Dicks, and Desperate Dames From the Heyday of Pulp Fiction

The Gang Magazine May 1935

The enduring appeal of the lowest common denominator

Who was the target audience for pulp magazines and books?

Judging by the cover art and content, the vast majority of pulps were designed to appeal primarily to a young, lower-middle-class male audience. Many urban youths, immigrants, and other lower- and middle-class males were drawn to the pulps by the vivid cover art—which often featured voluptuous women in need of rescue—and became literate reading popular “adventure,” “spicy,” and “true crime” stories. There were also some “romance” and “confessional” pulp periodicals aiming for a female readership, such as Ideal Love, True Confessions, and All-Story Love Stories, and the Harlequin romance novels had their predecessors.

Who were the illustrators who created these images, and what became of the original works?

There were a number of talented artists who painted the artwork that was put on the covers of pulp magazines, including George Gross, Rafael de Soto, Hugh Joseph Ward, Paul Stahr, and David Berger, among others. There are a number of aficionados who have collected and preserved some of the original artwork, but much has also been lost.”

You definitely want to read through this whole article – or at least scroll through it all to check out the amazing art work!!