Category Archives: Resources

We need your Reader’s Advisory thoughts for the Podcast!

CMLE is always looking for new ways to share ideas and information with you; and we have added a podcast to our information streams! If you have not subscribed yet, here are instructions on subscribing to our weekly podcast, weekly newsletter, two online book groups, and assorted social media!

Next week, we are podcasting about Reader’s Advisory, and we want to be able to include your thoughts and ideas. We have a few questions below; and if you have other ideas or suggestions please add them in the comments or email them to us at admin@cme.org! (If you want your ideas to be anonymous, just mention that.)

Our Monthly Topic for March was Reader’s Advisory; so we have a collection of materials here for you to check out if you want some ideas, tools, and training opportunities in this arae.

Reminder: CMLE Library Snapshot Day Will Be April 27

Snapshot Day Library Snapshot Day provides a way for libraries of all types across a state, region, system or community to show what happens in a single day in their libraries. How many books are checked out? How many people receive help finding a job? Doing their taxes? Doing their homework? This initiative provides an easy means to collect statistics, photos and stories that will enable library advocates to prove the value of their libraries to decision-makers and increase public awareness.”

On this day, we want all our libraries (and anyone else – we love all libraries!) to take a few photos during the day, to show the work you do. It does not need to be anything especially exciting, or fancy-looking; just show the work that library people are doing.
Continue reading Reminder: CMLE Library Snapshot Day Will Be April 27

Updates from State Library Services

Our LSTA Five-Year Evaluation and Planning
We recently submitted the evaluation of our 2013-17 LSTA Five-Year Plan to IMLS. Please take a few minutes to read about the good work we were able to do in support of libraries across the state. Read LSTA Five-Year Evaluation Report.

We are continuing to work with Management Analysis and Development (MAD) to develop a new 2018-2022 LSTA Five-Year Plan. We will use what we learned during our 2013-2017 LSTA plan evaluation process, and seek feedback from stakeholders to guide us toward solid goals for our next five years. Please contact Jen Nelson (651-582-8791) with questions about the Five-Year Plan evaluation or the Five-Year Plan development process.

Updated Library Trustee Handbook Now Available
State Library Services has updated the Minnesota Public Library Trustee Handbook. This revised edition includes updated content from the prior handbook as well as the Library Trustee Manual template published by the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) in 2016. The handbook is meant to be a useful resource for library trustees. It informs trustees about Minnesota’s public library environment and governance structure, and helps them understand their roles and responsibilities as library stewards. Its purpose is to give trustees a broad view of their duties and responsibilities.

Special thanks to Karen Pundsack, Executive Director, Great River Regional Library, and Audrey Betcher, Director, Rochester Public Library, for their insightful editing and content contributions.

If you have questions or feedback about the handbook, please contact Joe Manion (651-582-8640). Continue reading Updates from State Library Services

Let’s try Minecraft!

Minecraft cube Why Minecraft

“I believe in student-centered learning. Part of student-centered learning is giving students voice and choice in the classroom. A few years ago, back when I was a high school English teacher, students were assigned a culminating project on Romeo and Juliet. Students had to show what they learned during the unit in a medium of their choosing. A student approached me and asked if he could show what he learned using Minecraft. I had no idea what Minecraft was, so after having him explain the game and how he planned to use it, I approved the project. A week later he brought in a video of Minecraft characters acting out his favorite scene from Romeo and Juliet in a gorgeous, block-based Globe theater. This is how I met Minecraft.

Continue reading Let’s try Minecraft!

Book Suggestions for Autism Acceptance Month

April is Autism Acceptance Month, and a great way to learn more about autism is through reading about the experiences of others.

This list from Read it Forward features six titles with a mixture of fiction and nonfiction. Some of the titles include:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
“This bestselling-novel has seen great success on Broadway after it was adapted for the stage in 2014. Haddon’s fifteen-year-old main character Christopher John Francis Boone knows all of the world’s capitals and prime numbers up to 7,057 but can’t stand to be touched and hates the color yellow. His well-ordered life goes off the rails when his neighbor’s dog is murdered, but Christopher sets off to solve the mystery, using—of course—logic.”

The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida
“His unique book truly shines a light on what goes on inside an autistic brain; author Naoki Higashida was thirteen when he painstakingly penned this book—a collection of answers to frequently asked questions about autism, like “Why do people with Autism talk so loudly and weirdly?” and “Why don’t you make eye contact when you speak?” Brought to English translation by David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas, The Bone Clocks) and his wife, this disarmingly honest read is illuminating and beautifully written.”

Make sure to check out this list of picture books compiled and reviewed by a school librarian! Some of her picks include:

Andy and his Yellow Frisbee by Mary Thompson
“I loved this subtle story of acceptance, probably because Sarah reminds me of my daughter. Between Sarah’s effort and Rose’s calm but protective wait-and-see, this story gently conveys to typical children that there is no magic formula for interacting with someone who is autistic.”

Ian’s Walk: A Story about Autism by Laurie Lears, illustrated by Karen Ritz
“Ian’s Walk is a beautiful story with a simple plot, but one that conveys the complex sibling relationships inherent in special needs families. It’s an obvious story to share with siblings of autistic and special needs children (or even in support groups for such)”

National Autism Resources has several lists of children’s books to choose from, or check out this one from the nonprofit literacy group Books for Bay.

Find more suggestions for books and other publications from the Autistic Self Advocacy Network here.