Category Archives: Academic

Day Fifty Three of the CMLE Summer Fun Library Tour!

Fermat 8c81357625a7bdf0cd01f485812e02b1949b3dc3a3ab8476bbe24bc195acbc8c

Have you read papers that you wanted to annotate? Or would you like to get the ideas from a community of readers who are reading the same thing you are?

Technology brings you this power!

Fermat’s Library

“Fermat’s Library is a platform for illuminating academic papers. Just as Pierre de Fermat scribbled his famous last theorem in the margins, professional scientists, academics and citizen scientists can annotate equations, figures and ideas and also write in the margins. Every week we send you a new paper annotated by the community.

Here are a few of their papers:

  • The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge
    • Abraham Flexner – 14 comments
  • Ethereum: A Next-Generation Smart Contract and Decentralized Application Platform
    • Vitalik Buterin – 14 comments
  • Proof Without Words: Pythagorean Runs
    • Michael Boardman – 6 comments
  • Eliminating the Penny from the U.S. coinage system: An economic analysis
    • Raymond E. Lombra – 8 comments
  • On Being Smart
    • Nabil H. Mustafa – 12 comments
  • Electronic Lottery Tickets as Micropayments
    • Ronald L Rivest – 7 comments
  • On the series of prime reciprocals
    • James A. Clarkson – 4 comments

A librarian makes music recordings available!

Maroper Music
As library people, sharing information is our whole purpose. Figuring out strategies for putting together information to share is the key to success for us. So this librarian at Indiana University who has worked so hard to bring information, in the form of music, to patrons is pretty exciting to read about!

(By Mary Keck, Read the entire article here)

“Each day, Michelle Hahn walks downstairs to the basement of the William and Gayle Cook Music Library. The sound recordings cataloger and assistant librarian finds her way through blue and gray bins and stacks of boxes containing reel tapes, vinyl records, CDs and cassette tapes. She passes shelves of records labeled with the names of famous composers like Mozart, Handel, Schubert and Wagner. Then she reaches her office.

The large window in her basement office lets in the sun, which shines through blue and translucent empty plastic reels that used to hold tape filled with music.

It’s in this sunny space at her computer that Hahn makes it possible for almost anyone to access one of the largest academic music libraries in the world.

As a sound recordings cataloger, Hahn inputs information about the library’s collections into IU’s online library catalog, IUCAT. Without that information, the collections wouldn’t be searchable and accessible.

“I make sure people can find what they’re looking for and be sure what they’ve found is what they want,” she said.

Hahn’s behind-the-scenes role at the library gives patrons a roadmap to the 700,000 recordings in the library’s collections, made up mostly of classical music and jazz.

When a new vinyl record needs to be added to IU’s collections and a description doesn’t already exist in another collection, Hahn creates one. When she writes up her descriptions, she includes all of the relevant information that would be needed for someone to find the item, such as a title, names of composers, important dates and locations, the kind of music and the types of musical instruments used.

“Cataloging is intended to help a user search for relevant content, determine whether the content will meet their needs and locate the content,” she said.

Thanks to Hahn, you can easily locate and listen to the oldest Jacobs School of Music recordings from the 1940s and ’50s. The work of music cataloging allows you to hear the jazz of David Baker, founder of IU’s Jazz Studies Program, and listen in on the student performances of renowned violinist and IU professor Joshua Bell from anywhere.

“So much can get lost,” Hahn said. “Cataloging is behind the scenes, but it’s extremely valuable. It’s crucial in the digital information age.” Hahn has helped alumni find and listen to performances by deceased family members. Students have been able to pick their instrument out of a concert they’ve performed in because they’ve been able to locate it with the information Hahn provides. She’s also helped listeners access encore performances that weren’t previously listed in the database’s records.”

Librarians providing innovative resources for faculty, students

Public Library- the work of Leyton Public Library Service, Church Lane, Leytonstone, London, England, UK, September 1944 D22116
(From University of Chicago news,  By Andrew Bauld)

On-site research, teaching services benefit doctors, lawyers and entrepreneurs

“For faculty, residents and medical students making their rounds at UChicago Medicine’s Center for Care and Discovery, the key is focusing on patient care. Although it may surprise some in the age of Google, one of the medical team’s new initiatives involves bringing a long-established source of knowledge on rounds: the librarian.

UChicago librarians are providing customized and innovative on-site research and teaching services at a variety of locations across campus, including the classroom, legal clinics and business incubators. They offer expertise in locating up-to-date, peer-reviewed and highly specialized information using a wide range of digital resources—all outside the library walls.

Debra Werner, a biomedical reference librarian, joins an internal medicine team at the Center for Care and Discovery once a week to help answer the array of clinical questions that arise where doctors see patients—from the efficacy of a new type of medication to the trajectory of a particular form of therapy. Continue reading Librarians providing innovative resources for faculty, students

Announcement: Open Repositories 2018 – Bozeman, Montana, USA

Sign on southwest side of campus - Montana State University - Bozeman, Montana - 2013-07-09

Mary’s note: If you have not been to this area yet, I can tell you that it is absolutely beautiful! Bozeman itself is great, and has a wonderful public library; and the National Parks nearby are some of the most amazing places I have ever seen. If you are interested in this topic, consider attending. We have some scholarship money available to help defray costs!

Press Release:

“Bozeman, MT — Montana State University is pleased to announce the 13th annual Open Repositories conference June 4-7th, 2018 in Bozeman, Montana.

We are excited to host Open Repositories 2018 in this beautiful place. We encourage you to discover more about BozemanMontana State University, the state of MontanaGlacier National Park, and Yellowstone National Park as we plan for the conference.

Montana State University is a world-class research university tucked into a small mountain town just North of Yellowstone National Park. Home to both the rugged outdoors and exciting cultural activities downtown, Bozeman has something for everyone. The university is a mid-sized doctoral granting institution with a rich research enterprise, and the library is dedicated to repository innovation. OR2018 on the campus of Montana State University will be an invigorating educational meeting in the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains.

The annual Open Repositories Conference brings together users and developers of open digital repository platforms from higher education, government, galleries, libraries, archives and museums. The Conference provides an interactive forum for delegates from around the world to come together and explore the global challenges and opportunities facing libraries and the broader scholarly information landscape.

http://or2018.net

Holly Mercer

Associate Dean for Research, Collections, & Scholarly Communication and Professor

Director, Newfound Press

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

UT Libraries

611 John C. Hodges Library

1015 Volunteer Blvd.

Knoxville, TN 37996-0000

hollymercer@utk.edu

Virtual Work Question

Zonaspace-coworking-atmosphere

Here is a question from an academic library person, and a few answers from a list-serve. If your library has other strategies, share them in the comments!

“Our library is exploring virtual working models and we are trying to  gauge whether other libraries have implemented remote work practices for librarians.

If you have a librarian in your team working remotely (either full or part time) it would be great to know. Any details you are able to share are welcome too. Eg. How many days, what activities they are able to perform remotely etc.

Also, if this is happening with academics and other staff but not librarians, that would be useful  to know as well.”

Continue reading Virtual Work Question