Category Archives: Special

American Alpine Club Library

 Use our catalog to find books, maps, films and archives collections. 
American Alpine Club Library

Libraries are indeed the coolest places, in all senses of that word! Check out this article from Atlas Obscura, to discover just another interesting library. We have so many fantastic things across this profession, it’s always amazing to see the information people have to share!

“The club is chock full of historic archives, gear, and books from the 1500s to the present, all about the history and culture of humans going out into the mountains for adventure, exploration, science and fun.

The American Alpine Club Library and Archive has supported and documented the activities of the club and its members since 1916, and continues to serve as a resource to members, scholars, authors, journalists and the public, as well as a premier repository of the cultural record of climbing.

The library was established by a gift from Henry Montagnier, an American mountaineer living in Europe. It houses Mr. Montagnier’s collection of over 4,000 volumes focused on the Alps, with a particular interest in Mont Blanc, and includes many volumes which are quite rare today.

In an effort to improve accessibility for its growing membership, the AAC headquarters and library were moved to Golden, Colorado in 1993. A 1922 Beaux Arts building was purchased and renovated by the AAC, the Colorado Mountain Club and Outward Bound West. The 3rd floor of the building features a mural by noted Santa Fe artist Gerald R. Cassidy entitled Dawn of the West. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.”

(read the rest of this article on their website!)

Libraries really cover everything: Wine Libraries exist!

Glass of White Wine shot with a bottle of white wine - Evan Swigart
At CMLE Headquarters we are fans of all types of libraries. Being a multi-library system, we know the value of the work that all libraries – regardless of focus – do for their communities. But even we are surprised by the breadth of information available in some libraries!

Check out this article from the ALA about wine libraries! Hands up – who wants to organize a CMLE trip to Napa and visit these libraries?? Continue reading Libraries really cover everything: Wine Libraries exist!

Coming Soon: Love Your Data Week!

BigData 2267x1146 white
Love Your Data week is fast approaching on February 13-17, 2017! Please tell us if you plan to participate and we will list your institution’s name on the site so we can continue to grow the community of data lovers.

This year’s theme is emphasizing data quality for researchers at any stage in their career:

Blue heart for Monday Monday: Defining Data Quality
Green heart for Tuesday Tuesday: Documenting, Describing, Defining
Yellow heart for Wednesday Wednesday: Good Data Examples
Orange heart for Thursday Thursday: Finding the Right Data
Red heart for Friday Friday: Rescuing Unloved Data

Visit our website (https://loveyourdata.wordpress.com/) for content, resources, and activities for each day.  And join the conversation on Twitter #LYD17 or #loveyourdata!

  Continue reading Coming Soon: Love Your Data Week!

Podcasting – Jumping in Head First

 

check out Maria’s actual setup – pretty cool!

(by Guest Blogger Maria Burnham, from Sauk Rapids-Rice High School; read about our visit to her library!)

I’ve been a big fan of podcasts for a long time, and I love that podcasts are, once again, on the radar and a popular topic of conversation.  Several times over the last few months I’ve heard people say, “Have you listened to [insert podcast name]?  It’s so great!”  Podcasts sometimes feel like short little audio books; perfect snippets for those of us with limited spare time or those of us with commitment issues.  I listen to popular podcasts like Serial and Hidden Brain, literary podcasts like The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor, music podcasts like Tiny Desk, and book podcasts like Book Riot.

Recently, I decided that it was time to take podcasting into my own hands.  I’m an avid reader, and because of my role as the school’s “librarian” (even though that’s not my official title), I’m often asked to help others find a book.  In conjunction, I’m also in a high school setting which can sometimes be a finicky place to get reading traffic in to the library.  High schools aren’t like elementary and middle schools where classes of kids come down once a week to check books in and out.  Instead, I often rely on the roaming traveler in the book stacks or the rare, “My friend said I just HAVE to read this book!” for foot traffic.  Podcasting seemed like the logical blending of these two situations.  I could push out my book recommendations and at the same time try to create a bit more excitement about reading and the new books we have available.

Continue reading Podcasting – Jumping in Head First