Tag Archives: Coding

ALA, Google launch “Libraries Ready to Code”

The American Library Association (ALA) and Google, Inc. are launching the “Libraries Ready to Code” project to investigate the current nature of coding activities in public and school libraries for youth and broaden the reach and scope of this work.
“Libraries today are less about what we have on our shelves and more about what we do for and with people in our schools, campuses and communities,” said ALA President Sari Feldman. “Learning for children and youth today is more flexible, more self-directed, and with greater opportunities to not just use content, but to create and collaborate digitally. Library professionals are committed to facilitating both individual opportunity for all and advancing community progress. This new project with Google sits squarely in our modern public mission.”

Continue reading ALA, Google launch “Libraries Ready to Code”

Coding info for libraries serving teens!

Coding da Vinci - Der Kultur-Hackathon (14120891062)

Providing tech information and resources for your patrons can be a continuing challenge in libraries! There are several discussions floating around the library world right now about different areas in this topic; so we are sharing one here to see what kind of resources might be available for your own work.

The question:

I am wanting to give my teen homeschooling community access to easy and fun access to beginner’s coding courses here in the teen department of my library. Where would you suggest I start? (I have absolutely NO knowledge on how to code or where to begin!)

Answers:

Continue reading Coding info for libraries serving teens!

AASL Recommended Apps: STEM: The Everything Machine

everything_machineIn June 2016, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) announced their 25 Best Apps for Teaching and Learning. The apps encourage qualities such as innovation and active participation, and are user-friendly.

The Everything Machine is an app that allows young students to explore coding concepts by programming the different sensors on their device. Creations include a light switch and a color-sensing musical instrument. Students can use the camera, speaker, mic, and more to incorporate into their inventions. The app allows multiple users and features built-in tutorials.

Check out this article from Wired that features a conversation with the founder of The Everything Machine, Raul Gutierrez, about how his son helped him come up with the idea for the app. Common Sense Education has a review of the app, which includes information on how well it works in a classroom environment.

Cost: $2.99
Level: Elementary
Platforms: iOS

Watch their video here:

Code4Libraries

 

Many of you are working on coding projects in your libraries; this is your chance to tell other people about the work you are doing! Sharing this kind of information with the larger library community helps you (you look cool!) and it helps others to get ideas and stay informed! You know that technology changes so quickly, it’s hard to keep up.  This kind of sharing is a great way to do that.

So we are sharing this call for papers with you. If you want CMLE Headquarters to help you bounce around ideas, or to look at your drafts with you, or whatever else you need – we are here to help!! Continue reading Code4Libraries

AASL Recommended App: STEM: The Foos

the_foosIn June 2016, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) announced their 25 Best Apps for Teaching and Learning. The apps encourage qualities such as innovation and active participation, and are user-friendly.

The Foos are characters in this app of the same name that follow commands instructing them how to move (jump, walk, etc) which helps to teach kids coding concepts like sequencing, loops, and conditionals.  It’s an interactive game that encourages problem solving, and even has the option for students to design their own games. Teachers are able to download lesson plans as well.

This article from Beyond the Hour of Code gets a little more in-depth with game explanation and the includes a video about teaching using The Foos. You can also check out this evaluation of the game from the site Common Sense Education.

Cost: Free
Level: Elementary
Platforms: iOS and Android