Tag Archives: fun

Cast some Harry Potter spells!

If you are a Harry Potter fan, there are so many opportunities out there to attempt to recreate the magical spells from the book. One of my favorite recent versions is the Google-enabled control of the flashlight on your Android device.

Another new opportunity to try your hand at spell work comes in the form of a free, downloadable game! Designed by a student at Princeton University, this game looks pretty fun. Check out this article to read about the game’s debut at a Harry Potter library event, and don’t forget to watch the video of each spell!

Accio fun!

 

 

Spell Simulation game a Princeton University student designed for our recent Harry Potter event. There’s video of the 6 spells, and also a free download! https://popgoesthepage.princeton.edu/magicus-extremos/

Want to try some beautification projects??

Yarn bombing
Libraries are always thinking of new and interesting programs to try.  Have you been thinking about something new to try? Consider a program in beautification or street art!

These can add some excitement to your area, and also help to showcase the library as an organization that does interesting work. (It’s always good for us to not just be the “boring people with dusty books” when people think about us!!)

Try out one of these project, and then tell us about it!

  • Chalk the Walk: “Chalk the Walks (a project of The Joy Team) is all about spreading joy, optimism and inspiration through the magical power of sidewalk chalk. Remember when you were a kid and you’d draw pictures and write happy thoughts with chalk in your driveway and down the sidewalks of your  street? And the adults always smiled when they read the big, pastel-colored messages? This is just like that. Only we’re bigger now. And we don’t have to go in the house when the street lights go out.  The idea is as simple as it was in childhood: write happy messages, have fun doing it, spread some joy while you’re at it.”
  • Moss Graffiti: “Contemporary artists have discovered that street art is not only beautiful to look at, but that it can also be soft and smooth to the touch. Moss graffiti is eco-friendly as it doesn’t use any aerosols; what the “painting” needs is just a dash of water to thrive. Here is a recipe for how to make your own moss graffiti. Just bear in mind that choosing the right space for street art is very important.”
  • Yarn Bombing: “While yarn installations – called yarn bombs or yarnstorms – may last for years, they are considered non-permanent, and, unlike other forms of graffiti, can be easily removed if necessary. Nonetheless, the practice is still technically illegal in some jurisdictions, though it is not often prosecuted vigorously. While other forms of graffiti may be expressive, decorative, territorial, socio-political commentary, advertising or vandalism, yarn bombing was initially almost exclusively about reclaiming and personalizing sterile or cold public places. It has since developed with groups graffiti knitting and crocheting worldwide, each with their own agendas and public graffiti knitting projects being run.”
  • Rainworks: Using hydrophobic spray, you can paint designs on concrete that are invisible – until rain shows the art! “Anybody can visit our official tutorial page to learn how to make their own rainworks. We’ve shared all of our tips & tricks from our years of experience so that you can avoid making the mistakes we made while we were learning.  The Official Rainworks Map now has over 100 rainworks, from dozens of contributors, spanning over 4 continents. Anybody who makes a rainwork can add its location to the map!”

Teen cooking program suggestions!

US Navy 090818-N-6326B-001 Staff and patients participate in a healthy cooking class at Naval Medical Center San Diego
These are suggestions for teen cooking programs from assorted libraries – but they could easily be done for all ages! The library people running these programs report they get a very good turnout; so might be a fun (potentially messy – never wrong) way to bring some new life into your programming.

Note: If your library does cooking programs, know that the CMLE HQ staff is ready and willing (even eager!) to come help with the taste testing! (And if you were not planning to include taste testers – we still volunteer!)

  • Teen Iron Chef
  • Cupcake Wars
  • Cake Boss
  • Fruit Bouquets
  • Stranger Things Cookie Bake-Off ( teens stop by the teen room to pick up a mystery ingredient that they have to incorporate into their cookies; since our theme is Stranger Things/80’s, we’ll be asking teens to use ingredients like Marshmallow Fluff, Teddy Grahams, and other snack foods that were released in the 80’s)
  • Make pasta from scratch – with rolling pins, the way my grandmother made it, not with a machine
  • A culinary school near by and the owner and an assistant (possibly student) came and did a pizza making program
  • Hunger Games Cornucopia themed food program where teens had to rush into the Cornucopia and grab an unmarked bag. They then had a certain amount of time to create a food creation using all of the ingredient.

CMLE socializes!

CMLE is constantly working to build connections across our system! And our regular social dinner gatherings are a great way to help people meet up and build your networks!

As you can see, we had a great time visiting Old Chicago. Several of us had dessert; we just couldn’t tear ourselves away!

We will have a poll up soon for our next day and location. Be thinking about where you would like to gather in early May! Feel free to add any suggestions in the comments, or email to us.

Oyster River Middle School Bridge Club takes over Library

GoldenGateBridge-001
Check out this article on a fun library program!

“DURHAM — Friday afternoons at a school often resembles the likes of an abandoned building. Eager to start their weekends, staff and students vacate the building at the sound of the dismissal bell, leaving the building silent. However, this is not the case for Oyster River Middle School.

Though the halls are empty and the parking lot barren, one will hear the buzz of discussion and laughter emanating from the ORMS library every Friday afternoon.

For the past five years, the ORMS Bridge Club has taken over the library on Friday afternoons. Run entirely by parents and volunteers, the club has become one of the school’s most popular after school activities. Students in grades five through eight flock the library each Friday afternoon, pushing off the start of the weekend for just a few more hours of fun at school.

The club is run by Lisa Allison and her husband, Nate. Though their son now attends high school, the Allisons return to ORMS every Friday to teach new generations the game of bridge.

“My parents taught me to play bridge when I was seven or eight years old,” said Lisa Allison. “I was not a good player by any means, but I had fun.”

Allison continued to play bridge well into her adult years. When her son was a toddler, she joined a parent group and began to teach and play bridge with other parents while their children socialized and played. Once her son was old enough to attend school, Allison joined the American Contract Bridge League and began to play duplicate bridge for Master Points. As her passion for bridge grew, Allison wanted to share the game with younger generations in hopes of getting the game alive and relevant.

When her son entered 5th grade in 2011, Allison partnered with another parent to start a Bridge Club at ORMS. Though they began with only four members — the minimum required to play bridge — the club has grown exponentially. For the 2016-2017 school year, Bridge Club has nearly 60 students on its roster.”

(read the rest of this article!)