Tag Archives: YA

Booked for the Evening event

Are you a school, children’s or teen librarian looking to connect with others in your field and get some great book suggestions at the same time? Definitely check out Booked for the Evening, an event at St. Kate’s in St. Paul. Attendees will be able to “hear from expert panelists as they review the best new literature for kids and teens.”

The event is only $20 and takes place Monday, November 13, 6:00–8:45 p.m. in the Rauenhorst Ballroom.

The event features a “panel of expert librarians, who are graduates of the St. Kate’s master in library and information science (MLIS) program, will highlight books for primary, intermediate, and young adult readers. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about the best in recent literature for youth.”

Read the schedule, meet the experts, and register for this fun event here!

Guest Blogger: Teen Lit Con 2017 Recap!

This is a guest post from Bethany Kauffman, Media Specialist at Rogers High School, about attending Twin Cities Teen Lit Con 2017.

There is something special about finding “your people” in the world.  As book lovers, we seem to find our kindred spirits almost organically at work, church and in our neighborhoods.  Finding “your people” is such an important part of life that I relish any chance to help my students meet and connect with other teen book lovers like them.  CMLE made that happen for Rogers and Sauk Rapids – Rice high school students this past spring.

On Saturday, May 6 2017 at Henry Sibley High School, Minnesota’s metro public libraries brought one of the most popular and controversial authors of the moment to Twin Cities teens.  Sauk Rapids – Rice and Rogers High Schools were able to load up teenagers and get them to St. Paul for the big event through the support of CMLE.  What made the day so hype-worthy was that we saw, wait for it… Jay Asher!  Yes, that Jay Asher, whose books had suddenly become the topic of controversy and passion with the airing of 13 Reasons Why on Netflix.

Adults had suddenly become aware of Jay Asher and his writing, his honest conversations about hard subjects and the power that words and ideas can have in a teenager’s life.  Those of us who work with teens, read YA and love the awkward eagerness of all things before age 25 already knew all about Jay Asher.  We spend our days talking to young adults about serious and not so serious topics.  Sometimes hair color and friend drama is as deep as it gets but that’s what makes this age so great.  They are thinking, growing, learning, observing, trying on different personas nearly every week and they aren’t shocked when a YA book tackles a tough topic like suicide.  Young adults welcome stories that push the edges and make them think deeply about life.

As a result, I wasn’t surprised when we were packed into the auditorium at Henry Sibley High and the atmosphere was what I can only describe as electric.  It was the first session of what was going to be a day filled with book-loving kindred spirits galore.  When Jay Asher, Jeff Zentner, Box Brown and Meg Medina walked onto the stage for the first author panel of the day the auditorium exploded with the kinds of screams and roars and clapping that is usually only heard at a rock concert.  I am not kidding.  The teenagers shook the roof!  Let that soak in.  Teenagers screaming their heads off, nearly fainting over authors not athletes, millionaires, movie stars or music icons.  They were with their people and they were screaming at the top of their lungs for what they loved – ideas, emotions and creativity in books.

The rest of the day went well.  It followed a typical conference schedule with a variety of sessions and activities.  The teens had opportunities to be a part of several writing workshops, meet Minnesota authors, buy books, get autographs, try out Book Speed Dating, discuss creative nonfiction, find out about the behind-the-scenes work of creating graphic novels and meet real book editors.  One of the most highly attended sessions dealt with mental health issues in YA lit.  You literally could not get in the door of that session it was so full.  There were also t-shirts and concessions and an exhibit hall and temporary tattoos.  All good events have temporary tattoos.

When the afternoon came to an end, my 11 students from Rogers High School and the 25 students from Sauk Rapids – Rice High School piled into the bus and started home.  I was so grateful that we joined the teens from another high school for the long ride.  There were plenty of awkward introductions and graphic novel discussions and shy exchanges of artwork and books between students who had never met before.  Book lovers find common ground quickly and everyone headed home happy.  CMLE was the impetus behind this amazing day.  They encouraged us to coordinate between our schools, facilitated our communication and awarded us a grant to cover the cost of the bus.  As a result, this day was free to our students and for several of them, I’m sure, that made attending Teen Lit Con possible.

The new school year is here and it’s once again time to bring teens and books together.  It’s time to start fostering relationships that drifted over the summer, get the book clubs up and running, unpack the first book order of the year AND it’s time to talk to our teens about Twin Cities Teen Lit Con 2018.  Why not join us?  Rogers High School is going to make sure we are at the next convention.  We’d love to connect with your teens and share the love of all things authors, illustrators, writers and YA lit with you.  Start thinking now about giving your teens the opportunity to find “their people” at Twin Cities Teen Lit Con in the spring.

https://teenlitcon.com/

Bethany Kauffman
Media Specialist
Book Club Advisory
Rogers High School
Rogers, MN
bethany.kauffman@isd728.org

Looking for book suggestions: Donor-conceived characters in YA or MG literature

Books-aj.svg aj ashton 01

CMLE members: this is a library person looking for suggestions. She found a few already, posted below; but if you have others, post them to the comments!

“Once a year I ask the collective wisdom if they’ve come across any donor-conceived characters in YA or MG literature in their past year of reading since one person (me) can’t possibly read everything!

I’m wondering if any of you have come across any more. Donor-conceived people are those conceived with sperm, egg, or embryo donation, usually to single mothers by choice, gay parents, or those with fertility struggles in heterosexual families who can’t use their own gametes to conceive. I am interested in how identity as a donor-conceived teen or tween is represented in YA or MG literature.

I curate a list on my YA Books for Door Offspring blog and I am always on the look out for more fiction on this topic.”

You’re Welcome, Universe / Whitney Gardner

The Upside of Unrequited / Beckly Albertalli

The Secret of a Heart Note / Stacey Lee

Swing Sideways / Nanci Turner Steveson

The Other F-Word / Natasha Friend

Saving Montgomery Sole / Mariko Tamaki

Spirit Level / Sarah N. Harvey

Ashes to Asheville by Sarah Dooley

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue

Some YA audiobook recommendations!

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, english

A library person was recently asking for suggestions for audiobooks; so we are passing on the responses for your own thoughts for your collections!

“What’s your favorite YA audiobook? I’m looking for suggestions of good books, but also great narration.

I am asking for both personal and professional reasons. I have started listening to YA audiobooks in the teen room when we’re not crazy busy. The patrons like it, and a good number of them drift to the CD section now. I am also planning a booklist and display called “Now Hear This” with books and their audio. Thanks in advance.”

Continue reading Some YA audiobook recommendations!

Latest YALSA News!

http://www.ala.org/yalsa

Teens’ Top Ten Book Giveaway

Have you heard? In celebration of the upcoming announcement of the 2017 Teens’ Top Ten (TTT) nominees on Thursday, April 13th, during National Library Week, 50 sets of the 2017 TTT nominees will be given away to libraries in need generously funded by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. And applications are open now! You can apply for the giveaway via the online form by May 1, 2017. To be eligible, applicants must be personal YALSA members and work in a library within 20 miles of a Dollar General store. Other eligibility requirements also apply. Learn more and apply here.

2017 Teen Read Week Site

Make sure you keep an eye on our Teen Read Week site at teenreadweek.ning.com early next week, during National Library Week, for an update featuring the 2017 theme! This year’s Teen Read Week will be celebrated October 8th-14th! So, don’t forget to sign up for an account to get the latest news, if you haven’t already.
Continue reading Latest YALSA News!