Tag Archives: Programming

Episode 214: Programming

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Programming in libraries is the tool we use to connect our services with our community members. All libraries and archives do some level of programming, and for most of us doing more is better. But finding time to develop programs our community members want and need, advertising it to everyone, getting needed materials, doing the programming, and doing evaluation of the results is a lot to handle! To help us with this, we have Guest Host Angie Yanke, from Zimmerman Middle-High School.

We have talked about building connections across your community, and programming can be a tool you use to reach out to connect people with your materials and resources. This is something very individual to each library or archive or history center – everyone will have a different population needing to be reached.

Some jobs are all programming and outreach, all the time. Most public services library people will be doing some level of programming, in addition to their other work. So, how do you know what to do? If you are new to your job, or new to doing programming, or just want to spice up your programming offerings in your library, where do you start? We have a few tips!

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Want to talk with us about this topic? Do you, your staff, or your organization need training in this topic? Want to write a policy, or develop a program?  We are here for you!
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Spotlight Program: Blankets in the Library

At CMLE, we so enjoy all our different types of libraries, archives, and other members! Seeing all the work you are doing is so inspiring; and we want to return the favor by helping you to find some of the great programming going on around the profession.

Each week we will share an interesting program we find. It may inspire you to do exactly the same thing; or to try something related; or just to try out some different programming ideas. (On November 9, 2017, we will drop a podcast episode on Library Programming; you can tune in here to check it out! Or, of course, subscribe or stream to enjoy any of the episodes!)
Blankets 5

Library blankets for the win

by Ned Potter

I’ve had a number of emails recently asking after our blankets in the library at the University of York, so I thought I’d blog about them.

Getting blankets for the library is probably one of the best things I’ve ever done in libraryland, honestly.  It took almost no effort and very little money. The students LOVE them. Everyone’s a winner.

The quote in the title is from our feedback board where we asked students for tips for their peers…

We bought 30 blankets for each of our sites. We get them from a local laundry who also launder them for us – but you can also buy perfectly serviceable and cheap examples from for example IKEA if you have your own laundry service to hand. They’re laundered termly unless there’s a reason to bring that schedule forward…

They sit in a bucket near the entrance of each library, and people can help themselves to them as they come and go….

You’ll notice the blankets are a fairly drab grey – this is deliberate, to make them less tempting to abscond with…

Origins

Like all academic libraries, our number 1 complaint for users is about the temperature – and it’s equally split between too hot and too cold most of the time. We don’t actually control the temperature anyhow, so we adopted the UX mentality of ‘if you can’t fix the problem at least make the user experience better in any way you can’ and tried to improve things in what small ways we could…

The students involved were really pleased but the great thing is EVERYONE was really pleased.

So as we head into the colder months, see if you can do this for your library. Or even better, get your students SLANKETS so their arms are still free for reading. 🙂 ”

(Read the entire article here!)

Spotlight Program: Ada Lovelace Day

Ada Lovelace portraitAt CMLE, we so enjoy all our different types of libraries, archives, and other members! Seeing all the work you are doing is so inspiring; and we want to return the favor by helping you to find some of the great programming going on around the profession.

Each week we will share an interesting program we find. It may inspire you to do exactly the same thing; or to try something related; or just to try out some different programming ideas. (On November 9, 2017, we will drop a podcast episode on Library Programming; you can tune in here to check it out! Or, of course, subscribe or stream to enjoy any of the episodes!)

At CMLE, we celebrate STEM programming!! You may want to get on board with the Ada Lovelace Day programming coming up in October! Ada is regarded as the first computer programmer – and we depend on her work today.

Have you been to Codeacademy? Lynda? EdX? Coursera? Girls Who Code? Black Girls Code? Scratch?

There are so many resources out there to help yourself, or your community members, learn to code! And when you do: think of Ada and all the great things she helped to make possible.

Celebrating women in STEM

“Ada Lovelace Day (ALD) is an international celebration day of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). It aims to increase the profile of women in STEM and, in doing so, create new role models who will encourage more girls into STEM careers and support women already working in STEM.

Founded in 2009 by Suw Charman-Anderson, it is now held every year on the second Tuesday of October. It features a flagship Ada Lovelace Day Live! ‘science cabaret’ event in London, UK, at which women in STEM give short talks about their work or about other women who have inspired them, or perform short comedy or musical interludes with a STEM focus. This year’s event will be held on Tuesday 10 October 2017 at the Ri in London.

The day also includes dozens of grassroots events around the world, organised entirely independently from the ALD Live! event. These events take many forms — from conferences to Wikipedia ‘edit-a-thons’ to pub quizzes — and appeal to all ages, from girls to university students to women with well-established careers. Every year, people in dozens of countries across six continents put on their own event to support women in their own communities. Anyone can hold an event, so why not get involved?

Organise your own ALD event

Every year, people around the world, people like you, organise their own events for Ada Lovelace Day. We’ve put together a handy organisers’ pack for inspiration, advice and resources to help people get involved by organising their own events. You can also chat to other organisers about what they are doing on our community forum!”

Edible Architecture Programs

Edible Book Contest Farenheit 451 (Bradbury)This is a solicitation for ideas from a library listserve; we are posting the initial question, and a few suggestions received. Have you done this kind of program? Share some ideas with us in the comments!

“I am doing an edible architecture program at my branch next month for children and families.  I am brainstorming edible supplies that I could add to this program.  I am dry to stay with dry goods and not use fresh fruits/vegetables for the sake of ease and prep time.  Some of the supplies I am considering:

  • Ice cream cones – cake and sugar
  • Pretzels – rods and sticks
  • Graham Crackers
  • Wafer Cookies
  • Fruit Loops
  • Marshmallows
  • Royal icing
 The children will have 45 minutes plus or minus to create within a few categories – the strongest, the prettiest, etc.  Do you have any other food suggestions?  Plus if you have done this program before any pros and cons?”

Continue reading Edible Architecture Programs

“Human Libraries” work to confront stereotypes

You may remember in our very first episode of our CMLE podcast we discussed how Penn State is using the concept of “Human books” to build connections between people with diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences. (Find that article here).

Since we think this idea is so interesting and smart, we were excited to see it back in the news again with this article from American Libraries Magazine. The article shares some history about the concept of Human Libraries and also describes how Williams College in Massachusetts is implementing it as a program in their academic library in order to “confront prejudice and stereotypes.”

From the article:
“Globally, Human Libraries have taken off in a big way. More than 2,000 Human Library events have been hosted in 84 countries since the project first started 17 years ago, according to Ronni Abergel, founder of the international Human Library network, who cohosted the first Human Library in Copenhagen.  Once the four-day gathering ended, Abergel says he couldn’t let go of the vital conversations that arose between his living “books” and “readers,” especially one between a police officer and a group of antifascist youth, a pairing whose relationship grew from antagonistic to productive within an hour.”

Read more about how to apply to be a Human Library and tips for “developing” your collection!